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International Day against the Use of Child Soldiers – 12 February

End Violence Against Children

One in every six children live in conflict zones. Each day these children must navigate extreme risks of violence, psychological trauma, abduction, and abuse.
 
And thousands of these children are caught in the eye of storm each year, recruited and used as soldiers in armed conflicts across the world. Between 2005 and 2020, more than 93,000 children were recruited and used by armed groups. 8,500 of these cases were reported to authorities in 2020 alone, and the actual number of cases is believed to be much higher.
 
On 12 February, Red Hand Day is catalysing advocacy efforts from around the world to raise awareness about children recruited for armed conflict. Civil society, governments and international organisations are coming together to demand that children not be used in armed groups or other military units and to promote peace, aid and support for child soldiers.

No child should be a soldier in combat

Children in combat is more than just a child holding a weapon. Those recruited are forced into hardorzous child labour, hired as spies or looters, and forced to kill. Recruited children are often taken in by force, abduction, or even compelled by families for income and food. 

There is risk of abuse and sexual violence, especially for girls. Trafficking of children, particularly for sexual exploitation which disproportionately affects young girls and women, has been found in all conflict areas across the world.

Since 2002, the UN has instated the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict in the Convention of the Rights of the Child. Ratified by 172 countries, it states the commitment that children under the age of 18 should not participate in military organisations of any kind and that recruitment for such purposes must be actively prevented. Yet, the UN’s 2021 report on Children and Armed Conflict notes that at least 15 countries have cases of recruitment and use of children in settings that need humanitarian assistance.

 

Source: Text & Image: https://www.end-violence.org/articles/red-hand-day

World Day Against Trafficking in Persons – 30 July 2023

THEME 2023: « Reach every victim of trafficking, leave no one behind »

The campaign for World Day Against Trafficking in Persons 2023 aims to raise awareness of disturbing developments and trends identified by UNODC and calls on governments, law enforcement, public services, and civil society to assess and enhance their efforts to strengthen prevention, identify and support victims, and end impunity.

In the context of trafficking in persons, leaving people behind means

  • failing to end the exploitation of trafficking victims,
  • failing to support victim-survivors once they are free from their traffickers, and
  • leaving identifiable groups vulnerable to traffickers.

At the implementation mid-point of the 2030 Agenda and ahead of the SDG Summit 2023 this year, it is crucial to raise awareness and reinforce global commitments to eliminate trafficking in persons.

To end human trafficking, we cannot allow this crime to be met with increasing indifference and impunity. We must strengthen resilience against exploitation and the underlying socio-economic and cultural issues that are conducive to trafficking. We must sensitize everyone to the topic of human trafficking and thus push attention towards those who can make a difference in terms of changing policy and national resource management to strengthen prevention measures, improve identification of victims, increase support of survivors and end impunity.

 

Source: Text & Image: https://www.unodc.org/

World Multiple Sclerosis Day – 30 May

World Multiple Sclerosis Day on May 30th creates an opportunity to boost awareness and connect those with MS to resources and improve support systems.

#WorldMultipleSclerosisDay

As one of the most common diseases of the central nervous system, Multiple Sclerosis impacts more than 2.3 million people around the world according to the Multiple Sclerosis International Federation.  The term multiple sclerosis means “many scars,” and this term relates to the areas that appear on the brain and spinal cord after the myelin covering our nerves is damaged or dies. The damaged myelin leaves a lesion behind. These lesions are identified by an MRI when symptoms begin to appear.

The resulting symptoms vary and progress at different rates for each person diagnosed with MS. The disease is unpredictable, progressive, and challenging to diagnose. The cause is also unknown.

While there is no cure, treatments are advancing to help slow the progression of MS and reduce the symptoms. As with many conditions, education, research, and funding are necessary.

 

Source: Text: https://nationaldaycalendar.com/world-multiple-sclerosis-day-may-30/    Image: National Day

World AIDS Day – 1 December 2022

Equalize

Every year, on 1 December, the world commemorates World AIDS Day. People around the world unite to show support for people living with and affected by HIV and to remember those who lost their lives to AIDS.

The inequalities which perpetuate the AIDS pandemic are not inevitable; we can tackle them. This World AIDS Day, UNAIDS is urging each of us to address the inequalities which are holding back progress in ending AIDS.

The “Equalize” slogan is a call to action. It is a prompt for all of us to work for the proven practical actions needed to address inequalities and help end AIDS.

Data from UNAIDS on the global HIV response reveals that during the last two years of COVID-19 and other global crises, progress against the HIV pandemic has faltered, resources have shrunk, and millions of lives are at risk as a result. 

We have only eight years left before the 2030 goal of ending AIDS as a global health threat. Economic, social, cultural and legal inequalities must be addressed as a matter of urgency. In a pandemic, inequalities exacerbate the dangers for everyone. Indeed, the end of AIDS can only be achieved if we tackle the inequalities which drive it. World leaders need to act with bold and accountable leadership. And all of us, everywhere, must do all we can to help tackle inequalities too.

Dangerous Inequalities

Dangerous Inequalities, the UNAIDS World AIDS Day report 2022, reveals that inequalities are obstructing the end of AIDS. On current trends the world will not meet agreed global targets on AIDS. Millions of lives are at stake. The new UNAIDS report shows that only urgent action to tackle inequalities can get the world’s AIDS response on track. It shows how world leaders can tackle those inequalities, and calls on them to be courageous in doing so.

 

Source: Text & Image: un.org

International Volunteer Day – 5 December 2018

The United Nations (UN) annually observes the International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development on December 5. The day, which is also known as International Volunteer Day (IVD), gives volunteers a chance to work together on projects and campaigns promoting their contributions to economic and social development at local, national and international levels.

Each year UN General Assembly invites governments to observe the International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development on December 5 (A/RES/40/212 of 17 December 1985). As a result of the resolution from December 17, 1985, governments, the UN, and civil society organizations work together with volunteers around the world to celebrate the Day on December 5 each year.

In 2001, the International Year of Volunteers, the Assembly adopted a set of recommendations on ways that governments and the UN could support volunteering and asked that they be widely disseminated. The International Year of Volunteers aimed to stimulate national and international policy debate around, and to advocate for, recognizing, facilitating, networking and promoting voluntary action. The year led to a much better appreciation of the power of volunteerism in its many forms and the ways to support it.

Source: Text: www.timeanddate.com  Image: volunteeringnz.org.nz

World Aids Orphans Day – 7 May

Children orphaned by AIDS are just a fraction of the problem, as millions more have been made vulnerable. Behind the statistics are millions of stories of human suffering. The AIDS crisis has a catastrophic impact on households and communities – deepening poverty and exacerbating hardships. More than 95 percent of children affected by AIDS, including orphans, continue to live with their extended families. However, these families are increasingly overwhelmed by poverty and struggle to protect and raise the children in their care.

Despite progress in funding, preventing and treating AIDS, the world is ignoring the basic needs of millions of vulnerable children. Few resources are reaching the families and communities that provide the front-line response, even though they provide the vast majority of care and support to orphaned and vulnerable children. A generation will be lost if we do not take urgent measures to support the basic rights of children and the families and communities that care for them. We can fight AIDS if we organize a long-term response supported by a strong political will.

10 percent of all HIV/AIDS funding should be urgently directed to support AIDS orphans and vulnerable children.

Background on World Aids Orphans Day (WAOD)
WAOD was initiated in 2002 by Albina du Boisrouvray, FXB founder and president emerita, to bring attention to the millions of children affected by AIDS. Every May 7, FXB organized a grassroots campaign to bring attention to the plight of children affected by AIDS and advocate on their behalf.

FXB initiated a worldwide coalition of mayors who engage their constituencies to respect and lobby for the rights of the most vulnerable children. To date, over 800 mayors and elected officials from 41 countries have joined this coalition.

WAOD advocates ask their home governments to direct at least 10 percent of all HIV/AIDS funding to support orphans and children made vulnerable by the pandemic.

Source: Text & Image: fxb.org

World Malaria Day – 25 April

World Malaria Day gives people the chance to promote or learn about the efforts made to prevent and reduce Malaria around the world. It is observed on April 25 each year.

Good healthcare is important to prevent and treat diseases such as Malaria. Good healthcare is important to prevent and treat diseases such as Malaria.

Background
Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected mosquitoes. About half of the worlds’ population is at risk of malaria, particularly those in lower-income countries. It infects more than 500 million people each year and kills more than one million people, according to WHO. However, Malaria is preventable and curable.

The World Health Assembly instituted World Malaria Day in May 2007. The purpose of the event is to give countries in affected regions the chance to learn from each other’s experiences and support one another’s efforts. World Malaria Day also enables new donors to join in a global partnership against malaria, and for research and academic institutions to reveal scientific advances to the public. The day also gives international partners, companies and foundations a chance to showcase their efforts and reflect on how to scale up what has worked. 

Source: Text: TimeAndDate.com  Images: MalariaWorld  refreshhealthcare.biz

Invisible Work Day – 3 April

Invisible work, it counts!

In 2001, AFEAS in Canada set up the invisible work day and ever since, throughout the world, the first Tuesday of April has become a symbolic day.

What is invisible work? Invisible work, unpaid, consists of all of the work done within the family and voluntary work done in the community, whatever the status of the person.

How to make invisible work visible? The recognition of the value of invisible work will improve the status of those who do it, generally women as mother and carers, without forgetting all forms of voluntary work in schools, hospitals, old people’s homes, sports clubs and various associations…

In 2010, it’s difficult to understand the lack of recognition and support for men and women whose contribution to their family and the community is judged essential for its development and survival? How can we mark this day?

Source: Text: cms.horus.be/ Image: YouTube

 

World Tuberculosis Day – 24 March

World Tuberculosis Day is a worldwide event that aims to raise public awareness of tuberculosis and the efforts made to prevent and treat this disease. This event is held on March 24 each year and is promoted by organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO).

The efforts made to prevent and treat tuberculosis are recognized on World Tuberculosis Day.

Background
Tuberculosis, or TB, is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which most commonly affects the lungs. It is transmitted from person to person via droplets from the throat and lungs of people with the disease. WHO estimates that the largest number of new TB cases in 2005 occurred in south-east Asia, which accounted for 34 percent of incident cases globally. However, the estimated incidence rate in sub-Saharan Africa is nearly twice that of south-east Asia.

World Tuberculosis Day, annually held on March 24, marks the day in 1882 when Dr Robert Koch detected the cause of tuberculosis, the TB bacillus. This was a first step towards diagnosing and curing tuberculosis. World Tuberculosis Day can be traced back to 1982, when the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease launched World TB Day on March 24 that year, to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Dr Koch’s discovery.

In 1996, the World Health Organization (WHO) joined the union and other organizations to promote World TB Day. The Stop TB Partnership, called the Stop TB Initiative at the time of its inception, was established in 1998. It is a network of organizations and countries fighting tuberculosis. WHO works with this partnership on to support the activities and events that take place on World Tuberculosis Day each year.

Source: Text: timeanddate.com  Image: askideas.com

 

World Down Syndrome Day – 21 March

All of us have come into contact with those with Down Syndrome at one time or other. Usually free-spirited and happy, and often surrounded by adoring animal friends, people with Down Syndrome seem to be able to enjoy the little things in life the way that many of us can’t—and in many ways, they do. However, they also face countless challenges on an every day basis, and many simple things the rest of us take for granted can prove extremely difficult for them, despite their admirably positive attitude to life. That’s why we should all take some time this World Down Syndrome Day to learn a bit more about this disorder and how we can help those who have it live better lives.

The History of World Down Syndrome Day
Down syndrome has been observed in all races for thousands of years. Sadly, many infants with disabilities were either killed or abandoned in ancient times. However, quite a few historical pieces of art are believed to portray people an even angels with Down syndrome, including South American pottery dating back the 5th century AD as well as some Renaissance paintings.

Down syndrome was first characterized as a separate form of mental disability in 1862 by English physician John Langdon Down. It was almost a hundred years later, however, that its cause, the triplication of the 21st chromosome, was discovered by Jérôme Lejeune. In the 19th and 20th centuries, many individuals with Down syndrome were institutionalized, few of the associated medical problems were treated, and most died in infancy or early adult life.

The eugenics movement, which is usually thought to have been exclusive to Nazi Germany but which was in fact active in many different parts of the world, began programs of forced sterilization of individuals with Down syndrome and comparable degrees of disability in the first half of the 20th century. After the Second World War, many advocacy groups for Down syndrome formed and began fighting for the inclusion of people with Down syndrome into the general school system and for a greater understanding of the condition among the general population, as well as groups providing support for families with children with Down syndrome.

The first World Down Syndrome Day was held on March 21st 2006. The day and month of the day were not coincidental, but were chosen specifically to correspond with 21 and trisomy.

Source: Text: DAYSofthe YEAR Image: Wikimedia Commons