image-i-nations trésor

27th Sunday of Year B – 2021

If you were asked what is the most important quality of… GOD, for you,
I imagine that you would choose the attribute that speaks to you most.
I expect that the answers would vary from one person to another.
People would speak of his kindness, his mercy, his patience, his compassion, etc.

The 1st reading of this Sunday (Genesis 2:18-24) mentions one aspect of who God is that I personally find very revealing.
The text says:

“The Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone.”
 
These few words tell us something quite astonishing,
all the more so that this text appears in the second chapter of the very first book of the Bible.
What is said, in fact, is that God knows what is good for us, human beings.
And not only does he know, but this is what he wants for us, what he is ready to give us.

The scene describes man – the first human being – trying to find a companion, someone… like himself!
Someone with whom he will be able to share his life on earth.
We see him going through all the creatures already present around him, but none of them responds to man’s need.
Not any of the living beings that surround him correspond to what he is looking for…

What is interesting in the text is that before we see man searching, we are told of God’s plan:
to give man this special companion he desires so much!
God has foreseen the need, God knows what is good, God is ready to provide

To me, this is one quality of God that I find most comforting:
in any and every situation, God knows what is good for us and he is ready to give us precisely that!
 
We are sometimes slow to understand this and to rely on his willingness…
The apostle Paul had discovered this and he was convinced that it was so whatever happened.
He wrote to the first Christians of Rome, saying:

“By turning everything to their good, God cooperates with all those who love him” (Romans 8:28).

Do we?…

 

Note: Another reflection is available on a different theme in French at: https://image-i-nations.com/27e-dimanche-de-lannee-b-2021/

 

Source: Image: PrimoBibleVerses

 

Feast of the Holy Trinity, Year A – 2020

 

 

 

 

 

There is an activity that some of us enjoy doing from time to time.
It is that of clearing out things –
we look at them, sort them out, discard some, and push others into another place.
We may get busy with that in the house, the garage, the garden shed, or simply an old cupboard.
It can be with items of clothing, utensils, tools, or the toys of the children.

But could we do the same with… our minds?
Would we be ready to do it also about…GOD?

Today’s feast of the Holy Trinity is perhaps the appropriate moment to do this:
Removing from our minds and hearts…
our false ideas, our incorrect concepts, our mistaken beliefs, about God –
all that is not according to what he, HIMSELF, says about who he is.

We hear him tell us in today’s 1st reading (Ex.34:4-6,8-9):

“The Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious,
longsuffering, and abounding in goodness and truth.”

This is what he is, what he wants to be, for each one of us.
If we could only understand this… and delight in his mercy and graciousness!

 
Note: Another reflection is available on a different theme in French at: https://image-i-nations.com/fete-de-la-sainte-trinite-annee-a-2020/

 

Source: Images: Unsplash

 

 

31st Sunday of Year C – 2019

Every Sunday, we are given some Bible texts to reflect upon.
They help us in different ways:
teaching and instructing us, guiding and inspiring us.

The 1st reading (Wis.11:22 – 12:2) and the Psalm (Ps.145:1-2,8-11,13-14) of this Sunday 
give us a description of God, they tell us what kind of a God he is.
And they tell us of his methodology, the way he is with us, human beings.

The picture of God found in these two texts are amazing!

He is merciful to all and overlooks people’s sins.
He spares all things, he who loves the living.
He corrects little by little those who trespass. (1st reading)

 “The Lord is gracious and merciful,
    slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.
The Lord is good to all,
    and his compassion is over all that he has made.

The Lord is faithful in all his words,
    and gracious in all his deeds.
The Lord upholds all who are falling,
    and raises up all who are bowed down.”   (Psalm)

I wonder how many people reading these lines could say, in all truth:
‘This is exactly how I perceive God’…

So many keep away from him… fear him… do not trust what these texts say of him…
And yet… THIS IS GOD!

Note: A video presents the scene of this Sunday’s gospel, the story of Zacchaeus, at: https://youtu.be/7TIwA1YgPII

And another reflection is available on a different theme in French at: https://image-i-nations.com/31e-dimanche-de-lannee-c-2019/

  

Source: Image: thebottomofabottle.wordpress.com

L’eurovision 2018

L’eurovision est un événement culturel important dont la finale prendra place exactement dans un mois.

Le grand concours de l’Eurovision 2018 aura lieu au Portugal suite à la victoire de Salvador Sobral l’année dernière. Les demi-finales durant lesquelles 37 pays vont tenter de décrocher leur place pour la finale se dérouleront les 8 et le 10 mai. La grande finale quant à elle aura lieu le samedi 12 mai. Elle réunira les 20 pays qualifiés pendant les demi-finales et les 6 qui y ont accès de manière automatique, l’Allemagne, l’Espagne, l’Italie, le Portugal, le Royaume-Uni et bien sûr la France.

Le duo originaire de Nice (Madame Monsieur) chante le titre « Mercy » qui évoque le destin des migrants et la naissance d’une jeune Nigériane appelée Mercy dans le bateau d’une ONG venue secourir des migrants. Une histoire vraie qui a inspiré Madame Monsieur (alias Emilie Sastt et Jean-Karl Lucas) cette chanson d’espoir.

Source: Texte: www.linternaute.com  Image: Freedom

Paroles :

Je suis née ce matin
Je m’appelle Mercy
Au milieu de la mer
Entre deux pays, Mercy

C’était un long chemin et Maman l’a pris
Elle m’avait dans la peau, huit mois et demi
Oh oui, huit mois et demi

On a quitté la maison, c’était la guerre
Sûr qu’elle avait raison, y’avait rien à perdre
Oh non, excepté la vie

Je suis née ce matin
Je m’appelle Mercy
On m’a tendu la main
Et je suis en vie
Je suis tous ces enfants
Que la mer a pris
Je vivrai cent mille ans
Je m’appelle Mercy

Si il est urgent de naître,
Comprenez aussi
Qu’il est urgent de renaître,
Quand tout est détruit
Mercy

Et là devant nos yeux y’avait l’ennemi
Une immensité bleue peut-être infinie
Mais oui, on en connaissait le prix

Surgissant d’une vague, un navire ami
A redonné sa chance à notre survie
C’est là, que j’ai poussé mon premier cri

Je suis née ce matin
Je m’appelle Mercy
On m’a tendu la main
Et je suis en vie
Je suis tous ces enfants
Que la mer a pris
Je vivrai cent mille ans
Je m’appelle Mercy

Derrière les sémaphores
Serait-ce le bon port ?
Que sera demain ?
Face à face ou main dans la main
Que sera demain ?

Je suis née ce matin
Je m’appelle Mercy

Mercy Mercy
Mercy Mercy
Mercy Mercy
Je vais bien, merci
Mercy Mercy
Mercy Mercy
Mercy Mercy,
Je vais bien, merci
Mercy Mercy
Mercy Mercy
Mercy Mercy
Je vais bien, merci
Mercy Mercy
Mercy Mercy
Mercy Mercy
Je vis bien, merci

Source: Texte: Aleteia

3rd Sunday of Advent, Year B

In all religions, whatever be the name and description of a given set of beliefs,
there are principles and prescriptions,
rites, and rituals, and regulations,
commandments and observances.

Whichever way they are formulated, there are admonitions saying:
“Thou shalt” and “Thou shalt not.”
The language used indicates clearly the ‘should’, the ‘must’, the ‘have to’
that guide the believers of a certain group.
And the behaviour of the faithful is meant to translate these into concrete actions.

This is the whole area of what WE are expected to do for God.
It is sometimes described at length and with much insistence.
Yet, this is only one side of the coin, only one aspect of religion.
There is the whole area of what GOD does for us.

This aspect is presented to us in a beautiful and inspiring way
in some of the texts of this 3rd Sunday of Advent, Year B.
God’s messenger acting in his name,

“brings good news to the poor,
binds up hearts that are broken,
proclaims liberty to captives,
proclaims a year of favour from the Lord.”  (1st reading: Is.61:1-2,10-11)

“His mercy reaches from age to age,
the hungry he has filled with good things,
he comes to the help of his servant,
he remembers to show mercy.”   (Response: Lk.1:46-50,53-54)

Why do we concentrate so much on what we should do for God?
This season of Advent is a good time to change our focus and, at long last,
to consider and marvel at all that God does for us, day after day!

Source: Image: 123RF Stock Photos

 

World Day of Migrants and Refugees – 18 December

The theme chosen by Pope Francis for 2016 is “Migrants and Refugees Challenge Us.  The Response of the Gospel of Mercy.”
“The tragic stories of millions of men and women daily confront the international community as a result of the outbreak of unacceptable humanitarian crises in different parts of the world,” writes Pope Francis.

“Indifference and silence lead to complicity whenever we stand by as people are dying of suffocation, starvation, violence and shipwreck,” he continues. “Whether large or small in scale, these are always tragedies, even when a single human life is lost.”

The Message also states:
“The Church stands at the side of all who work to defend each person’s right to live with dignity, first and foremost by exercising the right not to emigrate and to contribute to the development of one’s country of origin.  This process should include, from the outset, the need to assist the countries which migrants and refugees leave.  This will demonstrate that solidarity, cooperation, international interdependence and the equitable distribution of the earth’s goods are essential for more decisive efforts, especially in areas where migration movements begin, to eliminate those imbalances which lead people, individually or collectively, to abandon their own natural and cultural environment.”

Source: Text: Vatican Radio  Image: www.acmro.catholic.org.au/resources/migrant-refugee

World Day of Migrants and Refugees – 18 December

AFP4577491_Articolo
The theme chosen by Pope Francis for 2016 is “Migrants and Refugees Challenge Us. The Response of the Gospel of Mercy.”
“The tragic stories of millions of men and women daily confront the international community as a result of the outbreak of unacceptable humanitarian crises in different parts of the world,” writes Pope Francis.
“Indifference and silence lead to complicity whenever we stand by as people are dying of suffocation, starvation, violence and shipwreck,” he continues. “Whether large or small in scale, these are always tragedies, even when a single human life is lost.”
“The Church stands at the side of all who work to defend each person’s right to live with dignity, first and foremost by exercising the right not to emigrate and to contribute to the development of one’s country of origin. This process should include, from the outset, the need to assist the countries which migrants and refugees leave.         (Vatican Radio)

The head of the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, has urged European leaders to set up a « massive » refugee settlement programme. Antonio Guterres was speaking as a new UN report warned that the number of forcibly displaced people worldwide would « far surpass » a record 60 million this year.     (Source: BBC News email, December 18, 2015)

 

Year of Mercy

HolyYear

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis pushed open the great bronze doors of St. Peter’s Basilica on Tuesday December 8 to launch his Holy Year of Mercy, declaring that mercy trumps moralizing in his Catholic Church.

Francis stood in prayer on the threshold of the basilica’s Holy Door then walked through it, the first of an estimated 10 million faithful who will pass through over the course of the next year in a rite of pilgrimage dating back centuries.