image-i-nations trésor

Genocide International Prevention Day – 9 December

By its resolution 69/323 of 29 September 2015, the United Nations General Assembly established 9 December as the International Day of Commemoration and Dignity of the Victims of the Crime of Genocide and of the Prevention of this Crime. 9 December 2022 marks the International Day of Commemoration and Dignity of the Victims of the Crime of Genocide and of the Prevention of this Crime, as well as the 74th anniversary of the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (the “Genocide Convention”), the first human rights treaty adopted by the General Assembly. The Convention signifies the international community’s commitment to “never again” and provides the first international legal definition of “genocide,” widely adopted at national and international levels. It also establishes a duty for State Parties to prevent and punish the crime of genocide. Every year the United Nations Office on Genocide Prevention and Responsibility to Protect organizes events to mark this International Day, honoring the victims of genocide and the anniversary of the Convention.

The Genocide Convention

The Genocide Convention (article 2) defines genocide as « any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group … « , including:

  • Killing members of the group;
  • Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
  • Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
  • Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
  • Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

The Convention confirms that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or war, is a crime under international law which parties to the Convention undertake “to prevent and to punish” (article 1). The primary responsibility to prevent and stop genocide lies with the State.

Prevention of Genocide

To prevent genocide and genocidal conflicts, it is critically important to understand their root causes. While conflict has many causes, genocidal conflict is identity-based. Genocide and related atrocities tend to occur in societies with diverse national, racial, ethnic or religious groups that are locked in identity-related conflicts. It is not simply differences in identity, whether real or perceived, that generate conflict, but the implication of those differences in terms of access to power and wealth, services and resources, employment, development opportunities, citizenship and the enjoyment of fundamental rights and freedoms. These conflicts are fomented by discrimination, hate speech inciting violence and other violations of human rights.

In terms of prevention, the critical step is to identify the factors (discriminatory practices) in a given situation that lead to or account for acute disparities in the treatment of a diverse population, and to seek ways to diminish and eventually eradicate these possible causes of genocidal violence. Given that no country is perfectly homogeneous, genocide is a truly global challenge.

 

Source: Text: https://www.un.org/en/observances/genocide-prevention-day    Images: Newsd    Facebook

Journée internationale de prévention des génocides – 9 décembre

Journée internationale de prévention des génocides

En fait, le véritable nom de cette journée est « Journée internationale de commémoration des victimes du crime de génocide, d’affirmation de leur dignité et de prévention de ce crime ». Nous lui avons préfére le nom anglais « genocide prevention Day » qui a tout de même le mérite de la concision, sans perdre pour antant le sens de la journée…

« Les États Membres et la communauté internationale doivent rendre hommage aux victimes du génocide et à leur famille, en mémoire des souffrances qu’elles ont endurées, et pour ce faire lutter encore plus fort contre les manifestations de haine, d’intolérance, de racisme et de xénophobie. »Ban Ki-moon, Secrétaire général de l’ONU de 2007 à 2016.

Une résolution adoptée à l’unanimité

C’est en septembre 2015 que l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies a déclaré le 9 décembre, Journée internationale de commémoration des victimes du crime de génocide, d’affirmation de leur dignité et de prévention de ce crime.

Cette date n’est pas le fruit du hasard puisque le 9 décembre est précisément la date anniversaire de l’adoption de la Convention de 1948 pour la prévention et la répression du crime de génocide.

Convention sur le génocide

L’objectif de cette Journée Internationale est de faire connaître au grand public les intentions de cette Convention sur le génocide et son rôle dans la lutte contre le génocide et la prévention de ce crime. Elle vise aussi à rendre hommage aux victimes.

En adoptant la résolution sans vote, l’Assemblée de 193 membres a confirmé la responsabilité de chaque État de protéger ses populations du génocide, et renforcer les actions de prévention de ce crime et de l’incitation au génocide.

Un site à visiter : www.un.org    Source: Texte: Journée mondiale      Images: Journée Mondiale   Crif
 

World Day against Trafficking in Persons – 30 July

On the World Day against Trafficking in Persons, the UN aims to create awareness about human trafficking and worldwide efforts to defeat this scourge.

In 2013, the UN member states adopted a resolution which designated July 30 as the World Day against Trafficking in Persons. They declared that such a day was necessary to “raise awareness of the situation of victims of human trafficking and for the promotion and protection of their rights.”

The Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons was adopted in 2010 and urges governments worldwide to take coordinated and consistent measures to defeat human trafficking in all its forms. The UN plan calls for integrating the fight against human trafficking into the UN’s broader programs to boost development and strengthen security worldwide.

Many Children Are Trafficked
Almost a third of all human trafficking victims worldwide are children, according to the Global Report on Trafficking in Persons released in December 2016 by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). Women and girls comprise 71% of human trafficking victims, the same report states.

According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), around 21 million people are victims of forced labor globally, and of these, a significant number are also trafficking victims.

The UN plan calls for integrating the fight against human trafficking into the UN’s broader programs to boost development and strengthen security worldwide.

Serious Threat to Human Dignity
The UN resolution also states that trafficking in persons, especially women and children, constitutes an offense and a serious threat to human dignity and physical integrity, human rights, and development. Despite sustained measures taken at the international, regional, and national levels, trafficking in persons remains one of the grave challenges facing the international community, which also impairs the enjoyment of human rights and needs a more concerted international response.

According to the 2016 UN report, women and girls tend to be trafficked for marriages and sexual slavery, while men and boys are typically exploited for forced labor in the mining sector, as porters, and as soldiers. It also states that refugees from war and persecution are particularly vulnerable to becoming victims of human trafficking.

Source: Text & Image: TimeandDate

 

International Day in Support of Victims of Torture – 26 June

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day in Support of Victims of Torture is annually observed on June 26 to remind people that human torture is not only unacceptable – it is also a crime.

What Do People Do?
Rehabilitation centers and human rights organizations around the world celebrate the UN’s International Day in Support of Victims of Torture on June 26 each year. The day serves as a reminder to people that torture is a crime. This event gives everyone a chance to unite and voice their opinions against human torture.

Background
On June 26, 1987, the Convention against Torture came into force. It was an important step in the process of globalizing human rights and acknowledging that torture and inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment should be universally illegal. In 1997 the United Nations General Assembly decided to mark this historic date and designated June 26 each year as the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture.

The first International Day in Support of Victims of Torture was held on June 26, 1998. It was a day when the United Nations appealed to all governments and members of civil society to take action to defeat torture and torturers everywhere. That same year marked the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which proclaims that “no one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment”.

 Source: Text: timeanddate.com Image: Cathobel

 

Journée internationale de commémoration de l’Holocauste – 27 janvier

Chaque année autour du 27 janvier, l’UNESCO rend hommage à la mémoire des victimes de l’Holocauste et réaffirme son engagement indéfectible à lutter contre l’antisémitisme, le racisme et les autres formes d’intolérance qui peuvent conduire à la violence ciblée sur un groupe. La date marque l’anniversaire de la libération du camp de concentration et d’extermination nazi d’Auschwitz-Birkenau par les troupes soviétiques le 27 janvier 1945, et a été officiellement proclamée Journée internationale dédiée à la mémoire des victimes de l’Holocauste par l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies.

Le thème de la commémoration en 2018, « La mémoire et l’enseignement de l’Holocauste : notre responsabilité partagée », souligne le devoir permanent de tirer les leçons et de se souvenir de l’Holocauste.

L’Holocauste a non seulement profondément meurtri les pays dans lesquels les crimes nazis ont été perpétrés, mais il a également eu des implications et des conséquences d’ordre universel en de nombreux autres endroits du monde. Les États membres partagent la responsabilité collective de remédier aux traumatismes résiduels, en maintenant des politiques de mémoire efficaces, en préservant les sites historiques et en encourageant l’enseignement, la documentation et la recherche, soixante-dix ans après le génocide.

Cette responsabilité suppose d’enseigner les causes, les conséquences et la dynamique de ces crimes afin de renforcer la résilience des jeunes face aux idéologies de haine. Alors que des génocides et des atrocités continuent de se produire dans plusieurs régions, et que nous nous apprêtons à célébrer le 70e anniversaire de la Convention pour la prévention et la répression du crime de génocide, cet enseignement n’a jamais été aussi pertinent qu’aujourd’hui.

Source : Texte & Image : UNESCO

Journée mondiale de la dignité des victimes de la traite d’êtres humains – 30 juillet

« Cette première Journée mondiale de la dignité des victimes de la traite d’êtres humains est un appel à l’action pour faire cesser ce crime et donner de l’espoir aux victimes, qui vivent souvent autour de nous alors que nous ignorons tout de leur sort. Pour arrêter les trafiquants, il nous faut couper leurs voies de financement et saisir leurs avoirs. J’exhorte tous les pays à ratifier et à appliquer intégralement la Convention des Nations Unies contre la criminalité transnationale organisée et son Protocole additionnel relatif à la traite d’êtres humains ».    Ban Ki-moon, Secrétaire général de l’ONU

Une urgence planétaire
L’ONU nous invite à nous interroger sur la question de l’esclavage moderne et il est vrai que cette question concerne au moins 2,5 millions de personnes réparties sur la planète. Il s’agit aussi bien d’hommes, de femmes que d’enfants qui tombent aux mains de trafiquants dans leur pays et à l’étranger. L’esclavage dit « moderne » n’a rien à envier à ce que l’humanité a pu connaître par le passé et il est non seulement honteux dans son principe que par les maltraitances qu’il engendre.

L’escalavage, quelle que soit sa forme, n’a pas sa place dans ce monde !

Un site à visiter : www.un.org    Source: Texte & Image: Journée Mondiale

 

World Day against Trafficking in Persons – 30 July

trafficking-protest« Human traffickers prey on the most desperate and vulnerable. To end this inhumane practice, we must do more to shield migrants and refugees — and particularly young people, women and children – from those who would exploit their yearnings for a better, safer and more dignified future. » Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

Human trafficking is a crime that exploits women, children and men for numerous purposes including forced labour and sex. The International Labour Organization estimates that 21 million people are victims of forced labour globally. This estimate also includes victims of human trafficking for labour and sexual exploitation. While it is not known how many of these victims were trafficked, the estimate implies that currently, there are millions of trafficking in persons victims in the world.

Every country in the world is affected by human trafficking, whether as a country of origin, transit or destination for victims. The link between the refugee and migration crisis and trafficking in persons was highlighted at this year’s observance of the day by the UN Office for Drugs and Crime.

Source: Text: UN  Photo: OHCHR A demonstration against human trafficking